Archive for January, 2012

You got to know when to leave.

A few days ago I was talking to my Father. He’s 88 years young, a World War II Combat Veteran, and grew up during the Great Depression (the 1929 one, not the housing crash of 2008!) At 88, my Father is still as sharp as they come and still to this day regularly gives talks on leadership. As a Civilian Aide, to the Secretary of the Army (CASA) – Emeritus for the State of Pennsylvania, he is daily doing work to assist the Army units of his state. He is known for his powerful and motivating speeches on Veterans and Memorial Day and frankly, there’s no greater American.

He’s battling with the loss of his wife of 52 years. If you’ve read my previous blog on “Warriors learn from Warriors” you know what she has meant to our family. My Father has always provided sound and timely advice (some I’ve taken and as most children do, some I’ve not and I learned the hard way.) We were talking about general topics and we both love sports so we began to talk about the debacle at Penn State University with their Football program and how it’s going to be difficult to rebuild for the incoming coach. We talked about Coach Paterno and how long he has been at the program and by all estimation has done a good job of assisting the players under his charge with graduating and moving on to life beyond football. My father then said to me, “you got to know when to leave.” It’s my father’s opinion that Coach Paterno was there too long, and when you’re an 88 year old WWII Veteran, you have earned the right to your own opinion!

The lesson started here. He went on to say that regardless of the business you are in “you got to know when to leave.” The more I thought about this the more evident how crucial this advice is!! Looking back at my career I retired from the Army at the right time. I still had 4 or 5 good years left in me, but I was healthy, could still compete if I had to, but I chose the right time to start my next career. Looking back at my time working at West Point, I probably stayed there six months to a year too long. I knew I should have made the change but I was comfortable in the job, had the systems down, and as it’s said, could run on auto-pilot. The turbulence hits when you hand off the stick (Murphy’s Law!). Read the rest of this entry »

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